Attendance: 
Full Time
Starting: 
January, September, 2016
Schedule: 
Regular, Evening, Weekend
Campus: 
City Campus

OVERVIEW OF THE ENGLISH EDUCATION PROGRAMME

The English Education programme develops outstanding English teachers who prepare their students to become confident, capable and critical participants in communities of readers and writers. Our core belief is that, students learn best when provided with opportunities to read, write, speak, and listen for meaningful purposes in authentic literacy contexts. The programme, therefore, introduces our students to a broad range of content materials and instructional practices in the field of English Education. We also provide guidance to our students through discussions, presentations, assignments and projects that require reflective application of theories and methods within the practical realities.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Admission requirements for the various categories of applicants are as follows:

Senior High School Students          

Credit Passes in Core English, Core Mathematics, and Integrated Science or Core Social Studies (grade D or better) at the SSSCE;

Credit Passes in Core English, Core Mathematics, and Integrated Science or Core Social Studies (grade C6 or better) at the WASSCE;

Credit Passes in 3 elective subjects may include Literature-in-English, History, French and any of the Ghanaian Languages.

Students must have passes in six (6) subjects with overall aggregate of 36/24 at the WASSCE/SSSCE level respectively.

Mature Students

Applications must be 25 years and above at the time of Application. (Evidence of birth certificate of not less than 5 years of date of issue)

They must pass an entrance examination in three papers, namely: General Paper, Science/Mathematics and a Special paper in Religious Studies.

Successful students need to pass a selection interview in addition.

All applicants seeking placement at levels other than Level 100 will be made to register and read all compulsory professional education and general (English-related) courses. 

General Certificate of Education (GCE) Advanced Level Applicant

Applicants must have passes in three (3) subjects (at least one of the passes should be grade D or better).  Also the applicant must have had credit passes (at least Grade 6) in five (5) GCE Ordinary Level Subjects including English Language, Literature-in-English, Mathematics and a Science Subject or General Science (for a non-science student) and an Arts Subject (for Science students).

Post-Diploma Students

A good Diploma in an English-related programme (a minimum of Second Class Lower Division or better) obtained from a recognised tertiary institution with at least two (2) years post qualification teaching/working experience.

Foreign Qualifications

All foreign qualifications will be referred to the National Accreditation Board (NAB) to determine the eligibility for admission. 

All students must pass an interview.

HOW TO APPLY

Call these numbers: 0208 534 379/ 0244 887 601/ 03220 80795/03220 50030

Visit our website; www.gbuc.edu.gh or e-mail us on; gbuc2006@yahoo.com

Or

You can write to us through the address below:

The Registrar,

Ghana Baptist University College

City Campus

Private Mail Bag, Kumasi

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LEVEL 100   SEMESTER 1

EAS 101: Introduction to Linguistics (3 credits)

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the study of language in general. It includes synopses of all branches of linguistics and the relationship of linguistics to other fields. It covers areas such as phonetics and phonology, syntax, morphology, semantic with special emphases on morphology and syntax.

EAS 103: Conversation and Aural Comprehension (3 credits)

Course Description

This course aims at improving students' speaking and listening skills, increasing their vocabulary and training them in the functions and notions of language. Students practice using formal and informal English in a variety of situations. The aims of the course are to be achieved through organising group activities, discussions, role-playing, and listening to cassette tapes, among other things.

EAS 105: Introduction to Literature (3 credits)

Course Description

This course serves as a prelude to literature in general and the main genres of literature – poetry, prose, and drama – that are treated as separate courses of this programme. Therefore, topics such as: definition and importance of literature, types of literature, appreciating and interpreting literary texts, etc will be treated. Again, the course focuses on the various literary and sound devices of the three genres of literature (Examples are: simile, metaphor, satire, onomatopoeia, oxymoron etc.). Short stories on the three genres will constitute the main texts of this introductory course.

 

BGE 105:  Introduction to Information Technology Application (3 credits)

Course Description

The over-all aim of the MIS course is to introduce students to the basic architecture of a computer. It also focuses on how a computer works (basic operation system knowledge). It is expected that at the end of the course, students would have acquired some fundamental basis in the use of the computer, with emphasis on applications such as word processing (MS Word); spreadsheet (MS Excel); Data Base (MS Access); Power Point; and World Wide Web (internet browsing and email). Students would also be introduced to ways of retrieving information from various media. At the end of the course students should be able to use the computer with a certain level of competency.

The practical skills contained in the syllabus are directly applicable to the study of other subjects; centres are encouraged to provide opportunities for their students to apply their ICT skills to a range of contexts.

 

BGE 101: Communication Skills I (3 credits)

Course Description:

The course is an introduction to the uses of communication in modern organisations. It provides students the opportunity to gain practice in making decisions involving selection and organisation of communication content, in choosing an appropriate medium for presentation of information, and developing an effective writing style. Topics include: Parts of Speech, Punctuation marks, Phrases and Clauses, Tenses, Sentences, Reported Speech, Phonetics, Reading, Listening, Grammar, among other issues.

 

EDU 103: Foundations of Education (3 credits)

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with the insight into the social and philosophical foundations of education. This course is in two parts. The first part deals with the social functions of education while the second part deals with Western and African philosophical ideals that underpin the aims, content, methods and organization of education in Ghana.

 

 

BTH 111 Christology (2 Credits)

Course Description

Since Jesus’ ascension, Christians have asked questions about Jesus. What was His nature? What role did He play in creation? For whom did He die? The course takes, learners through an in-depth study of Christ in an attempt to understand His person, nature, teachings and work. Known as Christology, the study of Christ brings learners face-to-face with the most important event in history as individuals unpack the Bible’s teachings on Jesus. Learners will be stimulated intellectually and spiritually as they visit the decisions reached by the early church councils and explore the questions raised since then. Christology is a wonderful journey that reinforces the firm foundation of the faith and helps the church be equipped to share that faith with a lost world.

 

BGE 112 Personal Development 1  (1 Credit)

Course Description

This is a course designed to increase the success of the learner in school, at work, in the community and in the global society. Students will be able to explain personal development from Western and Eastern traditions, religious, economic and political point of view.  Students will discover their capabilities and be able to create. The course affords the students the opportunity to research and discover the principles, philosophies, and success stories of successful people, summarize a popular personal development book titled Think and Grow Rich and do personal branding. Students will do pragmatic studies about Leadership/ Followership/Situation with case studies.   Developing personal principles and philosophies and living by them is part of the course. Students will learn how successful entrepreneurs mobilize funds and manage their finances. The course also affords students the opportunity to know the types of education, how to combine education with work and to take advantage to ensure holistic development.

 

EDU 113: Child Growth and Development (2 Credits)

Course Description

Child growth and development is a study of the physical, emotional, social and cognitive factors of growth and development of children from conception through childhood. Topics covered include principles, stages and theories of growth and development. The course will also recognise heredity and environmental factors impacting on human growth and development from conception through childhood.

 

LEVEL 100: SEMESTER 2

 

EAS 102: Studies in Prose (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course trains students in the analysis of fiction. Particularly, attention will be paid to the structure of novels and short stories. This course guides students to the definition and recognition of the elements of prose and how to appreciate texts. Elements such as character and characterization, story and plot, setting etc. will be discussed. Selected literacy work would be used as the basis for critical writing.

 

 

EAS 104: Introduction to Language (3 credits)

Course Description

This course explores the functions of language, language development and personal growth. It looks at research into the nature of the four macro skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing and how they relate to learning. It also looks at the role of learning strategies in the encoding process. Specifically, the course focuses on areas such as: language structure, language use, language change, language development, language acquisition and historical development in English language.

 

 

EAS 106: Introduction to English Grammar I (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course focuses on theory and practice in the analysis and description of modem English, emphasizing syntax. The course takes students through the sentence as a unit of discourse, the types or structural and functional differences in speech and writing. Some of the topics include: ambiguities, speech arts, tense, aspect and modality (in verbs).

 

BGE 102: Communication Skills II            (3 credits)

Course Description:

The course examines principles of written and oral communication in business setting. Topics to be treated include: business writing skills in letters, memos, reports; interviewing skills, job applications, C.V writing, elements of formality, minutes writing, paragraphing among others. It further discusses editing, elements of book and magazine designs, oral presentations, and emailing.

BTH 102 Introduction to Worldviews (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with insight into the different types of worldviews and philosophies and their evaluation from a biblical Christian standpoint.  The course is in three parts: Firstly, a comparative study of the worldviews of the major world religions (African Traditional Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism). Secondly, it deals with an examination of the African cultural and Western scientific worldviews. Thirdly, it deals with a basic analysis of the worldviews of subjects as diverse as theology, ethics, law, biology, psychology, sociology, economics, politics and history.

 

BGE 112 Personal Development II (1 Credit)

Course Description

This course will enable the students to enhance and expand current academic and life skills. The student will become more self-aware, learn to use and refine goals, job search, cover letter, resume, and mock interview to initiate the career planning process. Students are also taken through various types of employment and rudiments of business plan to enable those who may opt for self-employment, especially after graduation. The principles learned in this course will allow the student to identify careers that suit his or her background, abilities and interests. Students with well-developed information skills and knowledge will have increased marketability in a variety of careers. In addition, students will be well trained in developing their career plans and skills and relationships necessary to pursue their post-graduation goals.

 

 

EDU 112: Educational Technology (3 credits)

Course Description

This course aims at introducing students to various forms and use of information and communication technology in preparing teaching and learning resources. More emphasis will be placed on alternative systems and models of instructional design; basic principles of design, methods and techniques of pre-design analysis; instructional strategy selection and sequencing. Students will also be introduced to technological tools for teaching and student learning; for presentation and development; and for administration and management.

 

EDU 114: Educational Psychology (3 credits)

Course Description

This is a comprehensive course designed to introduce prospective teachers to the psychological influences responsible for the behaviour and learning characteristics of individual students. It includes knowledge of the forces of nature and nurture as they affect the physical, psycho-social, cognitive and moral characteristics of the learner in school. It also includes knowledge on how the teacher can identify special needs in the individual as well as the principles and strategies to employ in helping and counselling learners to develop their potentials in full.

 

LEVEL 200: SEMESTER I

 

EAS 201: Studies in Drama (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course introduces students to the basic methods of analyzing drama. Students will be guided to distinguish between tragedy and comedy. The peculiarity of drama, including dialogue, action, multi-media element, and types of drama will be discussed. A comparison will be made with other genres of literature by way of character and characterization, plot, setting, theme etc

 

EAS 203: The English Phrase (3 credits)

Course Description

This course focuses on the various phrases of English language. Topics to be treated include: the phrase, pre- and post- modifiers of phrases, the headword, noun phrase, verb phrase, prepositional phrase, adverbial phrase, and adjectival phrase. Other phrases such as: gerundial, participial, infinitive, and appositive will be taught.

 

EAS 205: English Composition and Comprehension (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course aims at developing the writing skills of students. It reinforces the methods of development in composition writing such as: narration, description, argumentation/persuasion, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, analogy, process analyses, division/classification, illustration/exemplification, and definition. The course again aims at reinforcing the skills of comprehension, summary thesis statement and paraphrasing using texts from a variety of sources.

 

EDU 203: Education of Students with Special needs (2 credits)

Course Description

This course introduces the prospective teacher to the current issues confronting identification management and teaching of children with special needs in the regular classroom. The course covers issues on inclusive education and mainstreaming. Topics to be treated include mental retardation, learning disabilities, communication disorders, behavioural and emotional disorders, hearing-impairment, gifted and talented.

 

EDU 205: General Principles and Methods of Teaching (3 Credits)

Course description

The course deals with the general methods, principles and techniques of teaching in schools. It also endeavours to equip the students with the skills and techniques of teaching that would enable them provide adequate pre-service training in methodology to school teachers. Topics covered include the concepts and meaning of teaching and learning. The course also covers the intellectual characteristics of the learner. Also included are the physical and social learning environment and their implications to teaching and learning. General principles of teaching and learning and the general methods of teaching will be explored. Lesson planning and stages of delivery (introduction, presentation and closure) will be covered.

 

 

LEVEL 200: SEMESTER 2

 

EAS 202: The English Clause (3 Credits)

Course Description                                                              

This course employs an eclectic approach to the study of grammar. It introduces students to advance and complex grammatical structures and systematically relates these structures to meanings, uses and situations. Specific emphasis will be placed on the English clause. Therefore, topics such as: the clause, structural types (dependent and independent), verbal types and functional types (for example: adverbial clause, conditional clause, relative clause, nominal clause, noun clause, and adjectival clause) will be treated.

 

 

EAS 204: Sociolinguistics (3 credits)

Course Description

This course studies the relationship between language and the mind, dealing with perception, processing, and learning of language and language acquisition universals. Topics such as: meaning and scope of sociolinguistics, language variation, bilingualism, multilingualism, diglossia, triglossia, language choice, code-switching and language policy will be treated.

 

 

EAS 206: Contrastive and Error Analyses (3 credits)

Course Description

This course focuses on theory and practice in the analysis of English and Ghanaian languages errors made by learners and implications for second language teaching. Topics such as: the Contrastive Analyses Hypothesis, markedness and universal errors, mistakes, errors and error analysis, error treatment, etc will be treated.

 

EAS 208: Studies in Poetry  (3 credits)

Course Description

This course provides a close analysis of the language and stylistic features of poetry. The poetry features studied include structure, diction, prosody and the various sound devices used by poets in the creation of images. The course also introduces various poetic forms: narrative poetry (epic, ballad, dramatic monologue, etc.), lyric poetry (sonnet, elegy, ode etc.) and modern free verse.

 

FEB 202: Curriculum Studies in English Language (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course introduces students to the objectives, concepts and strategies of curriculum development as they relate to the teaching and learning of English. The various theoretical bases for determining the process, implementation, innovation and evaluation of the English curriculum will be discussed. Students will be guided to critically examine the JHS and SHS English syllabus to add a practical perspective to the course.

 

FEB 204 Practice and Criticism (3 credits)

Course Description

The course will provide a basic grounding in the history of literary criticism from classic statements to contemporary trends. Readings will loop back and forth from historical texts (including works of Plato, Aristotle, Sidney, Hume, Wordsworth, Marx, and Arnold) to a series of recent responses to them, responses drawn from some of the most influential voices in contemporary theory (including Baudrillard, Derrida, Benjamin, Zizek, Bhabha, Spivak, Butler, and Haraway). Other issues to be treated include: the nature of the text, and the power of language. Contemporary examples on literary criticism and practice drawn from films, other works of art, and a range of popular cultures will also be looked at.

 

 

BTH 202: Theology of Development (Special Course Scoring) (2 credits)

Course Description

This course is a study of the nature and principles of holistic development from Christian perspective. It is provides a theological framework for practice of development focusing on the need for spiritual, social, economic and environmental development.

 

EDU 212: Measurement and Evaluation (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with techniques in test construction, administration, interpretation and use in assessing students. Course topics include the concepts of assessment, testing, measurement and evaluation. Others are the general principles and practice of assessment and purposes of assessment. It also includes the nature, categories and factors affecting validity and reliability of test items. The course also covers construction, administration and interpretation (norm and criterion reference interpretation of achievement tests), measures of central tendency variability.

 

EDU 214: Classroom Management Practices (2 Credits)

Course Description

This course is designed to assist teachers (in public and private schools) to develop skills to help them effectively organize and manage their classrooms. It is also designed to assist teachers and administrators anticipate, prevent and manage behaviour problems in school. The ultimate aim or reason for this course is to prepare teachers to be effective managers of their classrooms so that student learning is maximized. Topics covered are theories of classroom management and their implications in the classroom. Behaviour management models and their applications in the classroom will be explored in this course. Other topics include best practices in classroom and behaviour management - from organizing time, materials, and classroom space to strategies for managing individual and large group student behaviour.

LEVEL 300: SEMESTER 1

 

EAS 301: Methods of teaching English (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course introduces students to principles, functions and goals of teaching English. It exposes students to current methodological issues in second language teaching and learning and reviews instructional aids used to reinforce these methods. It examines issues on effective classroom management and highlights the function and role of assessment in student learning. Also, the course will cover the following language teaching methods: The Oral Approach and Situational Language Teaching, The Audiolingual Method, Communicative Language Teaching, Total Physical Response, The Silent Way, Community Language Learning, The Natural Approach, and Suggestopedia.

 

EAS 303: Structure and style of the English language (3 credits)

Course Description

This course looks at relationships between the linguistic system and appropriate choices in specific communicative contexts. Determinants of the communicative context, formality and informality, fluency and accuracy, politeness will be discussed. Various concepts and how they are expressed - commands, requests, permission; the language of conversation, passivization and negation will be discussed.

 

EAS 305: Phonetics  and Phonology (3 credits)

Course Description

The Phonetics part of the course trains the students in Linear Transcription System and in production and perception of speech sounds, contrasting these with the sounds of students’ native language where necessary. It provides students with the description of sounds (place and manner of articulation) and their classification into consonants, vowels and diphthongs. The Phonology part of the course is concerned with the distribution and relations of sounds. It also provides the students with the various phonological processes and rules.

 

EAS 307: Semantics (3credits)

Course Description

This course introduces students to the basic concepts in Semantics such as Reference and Sense, Sense Relations, Word Meaning, Sentence Meaning and Utterance Meaning (Pragmatics) and Propositions. Students will also be introduced to the nature of Logic and Interpersonal Meaning as well as semantic roles, dimensions of meaning, lexical relations, speech acts, semantics of morphological relations, the semantics of prefixes and suffixes in English, the semantics of sentence elements, etc

 

 

EDU 313: Adolescence Psychology (3 Credits)

Course Description:

This course is designed to help students understand the role of developmental factors that contribute to the physical, emotional, moral, psychological, and sociological changes that occur during the transitions from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence to young adulthood. Topics to be taught include the definition and meaning of adolescence, adolescence growth spurt, identity development and theories of adolescence growth and development. Individual aspects of development, the contexts and social spheres that shape the process of development, as well as the behaviour problems of adolescence that result from bio-psychosocial interactions in development are explored. Patterns of continuity and transitions of adolescence in both group and individual patterns of development will also be addressed. Adolescence sexuality and some adolescence problems/issues such as adolescence violence, depression, and health will be treated.

 

EDU 313: Educational Statistics (3 credits)

Course Description

The course introduces students to the nature of statistics with a description of variables, scales of measurement and the differences between descriptive and inferential statistics. Data representation is treated with emphasis on frequency distributions, histograms, polygons, gives, bar and pie charts as well as box and whisker plots. The nature and role of the measures of location, variability and relative position are explained.

Students are introduced to the concept of probability with emphasis on the addition and multiplication roles and the nature, properties and applications of the normal distribution. Measures of relationship and correlation are explained and their roles in education are discussed. Basic ideas about statistical inference (sampling distributions) are treaded leading to an introduction to hypothesis testing. Statistical tools such as regression analysis, chi-square test, t- test, Mann-Whitney test, Wilcoxon signed rank test. One-way analysis of variance and the Kruskall-Wallis test are mentioned briefly with emphasis on when they can be used.

 

LEVEL 300: SEMESTER 2

EAS 304: African literature (3 credits)

Course description

This course is designed to provide students with skills and tools to analyse African literature.

The course introduces students to major writers in African literature. Students will be taken through a critical examination of the thematic and stylistic concerns of selected African writers.

 

EDU 314: Education Research Methods (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course introduces the student to scientific enquiry in education.  It presents to the student the nature of research, including characteristics of scientific research; the research problem, sources and characteristics of the research problem. The course also covers literature review, its relevance and steps involved. Other topics covered are the general methods including qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approach. Experimental (true and quasi experimental) and non-experimental (survey, causal-comparative and correlational) research designs are also explored. Some qualitative research designs will be discussed. Data collecting instruments, data collection, organization, processing, analysis and interpretation, as well as report writing are also discussed.  Measures of central tendency, measures of variability and statistical data analysis will also be explored. Students will eventually be able to, based on the above, effectively write their project work.

 

EDU 316: Introduction to Guidance and Counselling (3 Credits)

Course Description

Guidance and counselling assist in the complete development of the individual in a way that ensures or maximizes personal development in life. This course is designed to equip students with knowledge, skills and competencies to provide guidance and counselling services in the school setting. It also provides the student with information necessary to facilitate the guidance and counselling processes in schools.  The course covers the meaning and scope of the concept of guidance and its under-girding principles. The course explores how counselling services are utilized to deal with deviant behaviour among school children. It also covers the different approaches and procedures in collecting and organizing data to provide a sound guidance and counselling services in schools.

LEVEL 400: SEMESTER 1

PFE 401: Micro – Teaching (3 credits)

Course Description

This course provides comprehensive knowledge and skills in practical aspect of teacher education in a laboratory environment. The microteaching classes and sessions are to provide the student-teachers with theoretical information on teaching skills so that some of these basic skills and techniques can be highlighted and focused on. Theoretical in-class sessions will cover basic concepts in microteaching; and microteaching skills (set induction, closure, communication, stimulus variation, reinforcement, etc.). It will also involve environment for practice-based teaching to instil peer and self-evaluative skills conducted with a small group (6 presenters) from within a course. Presentations would take about 30 minutes each (including presentation, feedback and transition time).

The course will also give learners a broad view of microteaching concepts and provide student-teachers with the opportunity to practice, observe, and evaluate microteaching skills thereby learning how to share observations constructively with others on teaching. Thus, student-teachers will develop core teaching skills through guided planning, implementation and review of laboratory teaching experiences.

 

 

EDU 405: School Administration and Supervision  (3 Credits)

Course Description

The first part of this course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, techniques and skills of school administration and management. It examines the concept, processes and task areas in basic school administration and management and reviews the major theories and principles in management and leadership, and their application to the school system. The second part is designed to provide future educational leaders with knowledge and skills required for effective supervision of instruction so that student achievement is enhanced.

Topics to be covered in this course include concepts, theories, principles and facts about school administration, management and leadership. The administrative structures of the education management system in Ghana – the Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Ghana Education Service (GES) will be covered. Other topics will include traditional and contemporary definitions of the concepts of inspection and supervision, internal and external supervision and the aims and purpose of supervision. Other topics include models of supervision, approaches to clinical supervision and effective supervisory practices.

 

LEVEL 400: SEMESTER 2

EAS 402: Varieties of English (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course will guide students to analyze the linguistic patterning of texts to enable them to distinguish varieties of English as in business letters, reports, minutes, speeches, etc. Students will be taken through exercises in analyzing and writing to improve their own writing in different situations. Again, the course exposes students to the variety classes of English such as: regional variation, education and social standing, national standards of English, the Standard English, varieties according to subject matter, varieties according to medium, varieties according to attitude, and varieties according to interference. The course will also cover Pidgin and Creole languages.

 

EAS 403: Theories of Grammar (3 Credits)

Course Description

The course exposes students to the theory and practice of grammatical descriptions. It will examine traditions of grammar including Traditional Grammar, Structural Grammar and Transformational Grammar.

 

EAS 405: Oral Literature in Africa (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course seeks to acquaint students with the topography of oral literature in Africa. To highlight the essentially literary nature of oral literature, a classification of the theoretical and genre related problems in the area will be examined and discussed. Again the course discusses the socio-political and cultural relevance of specific genres of the literature such as the folktales, riddles, proverbs, praise, elegiac poetry, lullabies, songs, etc.

 

 

PFE 401: Professional Field Experience (3 Credits)

Course Description

Teaching practice plays a major role in the education of teachers. It creates the environment vital for student teachers to develop professional skills. This course is designed to expose students to extended periods of school teaching experience (one semester) under the guidance of experienced mentors and university supervisors.

 

FEB403:  Project work (6 Credits)

Course Description

This course aims at providing students some form of clinical supervision in the writing of their project work or dissertation. The supervisor is expected to assist the student to identify a researchable topic; direct the student to the existing literature; assist in refining the methodology; supervise the research process; and act as a critic at all times and particularly at the writing stage. At the end of the course, students, work is evaluated by their supervisors according to a laid down assessment format.

 

EAS 404: Ghanaian and American Literature (3 Credits)

Course Description

This course examines themes and trends in Ghanaian literature. Verbal and non-written literary expressions will be highlighted in order to provide a framework for discussion and appreciation.

Written and imaginative literary works by selected writers from Ghana will be critically evaluated in the light of their oral and historical origins as well as their literary antecedents.

In addition, the course will expose students to thematic issues and literary techniques in the work of major African American writers including Zora N. Hurston, Langston Hughes, Ralph Ellison, Jean Toomer, Richard Wright, Frederick Douglas, Sterling Brown, James Braithwaite, Earnest J. Gaines and Toni Morrison.

 

EAS 407:  Popular Literature in Ghana (3 Credits)

This course is open to the study of texts popular with the widely read by the average person of various cultures or historical periods. Popular literature includes well-defined genres in given cultures and periods and encompasses particular literary techniques that cater to the tastes, interests and needs of its readership. Popular literature is defined in opposition to literature ready by an intellectual and/or elite minority only.

 

 

 

STAFF LIST (ENGLISH EDUCATION)

Name of Staff

Sex

Highest/ Qualification

Institution

Rank

FT/PT

Mr. Edward Owusu

M

MA, MPhil, TESL

MBA B.Ed., Bus. Edu

UG, Legon

KNUST, UCC

Lecturer

PT

Miss Joana Serwaa Ampofo

F

MPhil Linguistics

UG, Legon

Lecturer

FT

Pastor Linda Osei Akoto

F

MA, TESL

UG, Legon

Lecturer

PT

Mr. Eric Adjei Baah

M

MA, TESL

UG, Legon

Lecturer

PT

Mr. Douglas Adade

M

MPhil, TESL

UCC, Cape Coast; UG Legon

Lecturer

PT

Dr. Peter Baffour-Awuah

M

Doc. of Education (Ed. D)

Murdoch Uni.

Perth, W A

Lecturer

FT

Rev. Prince Yaw Adofo

M

MPhil (Edn) MA in Ministry

UCC, Cape Coast

Lecturer

FT

Mr. Joseph Osei Tutu

M

MPhil (Curr. Studies)

C. A. Ghana

UCC, Cape Coast; ICAG

Lecturer

FT

 

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