Attendance: 
Full-Time
Starting: 
Semptember. 2017
Schedule: 
Regular, Evening, Weekend
Campus: 
City Campus

The overall goal of the programme is to produce professional French teachers capable of using modern language teaching techniques in the classroom (task-based teaching and learning techniques, use of new technologies in education, project-based pedagogy, etc.).  Teachers are not trained to develop only the basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) of their learners, but should be able to help their learners develop language competences by using appropriate speech acts in different communication situations.  This programme is carefully tailored to equip students with both oral and written aspects of French language.  The French language is the medium in which the French programme is to be taught while the teaching of other courses shall be in English.

The programme meets a wide range of linguistic abilities and is intended to help student-teachers achieve a variety of communication skills.  The language aspect aims at broadening students’ knowledge in lexical and grammatical structures in oral and written expression.  French literature helps students to study French culture and civilization as well as language usage and structure.

OBJECTIVES

The general objectives of the programme include the following:

(a) Training teachers in French Education;

(b) ; Preparing French teachers for the Junior High and Senior High school;

(c) Equipping teachers with modern techniques in foreign language teaching;

(d)  Helping student teachers acquire theoretical knowledge in foreign language teaching;

(e)  Providing student teachers with solid French language background.

  • Entry Requirement

Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination (SSSCE), West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE), and General Business Certificate Examination (GBCE).

  1. The general requirements for admission of WASSCE, SSSCE, and GBCE candidates to the first degree programme in French education are three (3) credit passes in three core subjects and  three (3) credit passes in three elective subjects (including French).
  1. SSSCE Candidates: Credit Passes (A-D) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects, including English Language and Mathematics, plus three (3) elective subjects (including French).
  1. WASSCE Candidates: Credit Passes (A1-C6) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects, including English Language and Mathematics, plus three (3) elective subjects (including French).

 

  1. GBCE Candidates: Credit Passes (A-D) in six (6) subjects comprising three core subjects, including English Language and Mathematics, plus three (3) elective subjects (including French).

 

 

  1. General Certificate of Education (GCE) Advanced Level Candidates

 

Passes in three (3) subjects (at least, one of the passes should be Grade D or better in French).  Also, the applicant must have had credit passes (Grade 6) in five GCE Ordinary Level subjects including English Language, Mathematics and a Science subject (for non-science students) and an Arts subject (for Science students).

 

  • Admission of Diploma Candidates

Post Diploma candidates (2-year programme) must have Teachers Diploma from a recognized institution with at least 2nd Class Lower Division. In addition, candidates will be required to take an oral selection interview.

 

Mature candidates must be at least 25 years of age and must possess Teachers Certificate ‘A’ in French or Diploma in Basic Education with a minimum of three years teaching experience.  Candidates are expected to pass an entrance examination in English, Mathematics, French, and General Paper.  Successful candidates at the entrance examination will be required to take an oral interview.

Apart from the general normal requirements, Anglophone candidates should have at least a Credit pass in French while Francophone students should have at least a Credit pass in English.  Candidates with a diploma degree (at least Second Class Lower) from a recognized university or college shall be admitted to level 300. Candidates with foreign certificates shall present same to National Accreditation Board for evaluation before admission.

  • How to Apply

Application forms can be downloaded at www.gbuc.edu.gh or obtained at the GBUC campuses (Abuakwa and City Campus – Asem – Kumasi)

DETAILED COURSE DESCRIPTION

YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1

FRE 101: Basic French Language 1 (Structure and Usage) (3 Credits)

Students will be made to learn a summary of the various parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc. together with the French orthography and punctuation) as well as other aspects of grammar such as subject-verb agreement, especially through conceptualization.  In this regard,

students will learn grammar implicitly.  The French Language I course will in fact help students to acquire the language system and use the corresponding linguistic competence in real communication situations. 

Reading List

 

1          Bosquart, Marc, Nouvelle grammaire française, Guérin, Montréal, 1998.

2          Girodet, Jean, Pièges des difficultés de la langue française, Bordas, Paris, 2007.

3          Germain, Claude et al,  Le point sur la grammaire, CLE International, Paris, 1998.

4          Bescherelle 2. L’orthographe pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 1990.

5          Larousse, Larousse Conjugaison, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

6          Dubois, Jean, Larousse Grammaire, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

7          Dubois, Jean, Larousse Orthographe, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

8          Lagane, René, Larousse. Difficultés grammaticales, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

Bérard, Evelyne. Grammaire du français. Comprendre, réfléchir, communiquer.

Didier Paris, 2005.

 

FRE 103 Oral Expression 1 (Phonetics/Phonology/Listening Comprehension)

Basically, phonetics and phonology (French sounds, syllables and phonemes, phonemic description, phonemic variations, the phonic syllable, phonetic transcription, for example) will be treated in such a way as to develop the phonetic skills of students to help them perceive the surface structure of basic sentences.  The end point is to enable students develop and use their communicative competence in real communication situations (especially through interactions) just as making them capable of doing listening comprehension exercises.

Reading List

 

1          Girodet, Jean, Pièges des difficultés de la langue française, Bordas, Paris, 2007.

2          Martins, C., Mabilat, J.-J., Sons et intonation. Exercices de prononciation. Didier, Paris, 2004.

3          WEISS, François, Pratiques de classe. Jouer, communiquer, apprendre. Hachette, Paris, 2002.

4          LEON, Pierre, Phonétique et prononciation du français. éditions Armand Colin, Paris,       2011.

5          Gernain, Claude, Le point sur la phonétique. CLE International, Paris, 1998.

FRE 105: Reading Comprehension and Summary Writing 1 (2 Credits)

This course involves the theoretical aspects of techniques of written expression and production.  Students will learn the skills of textual analysis to the point of being capable of extracting key ideas from a multitude of ideas.  Thus, they will be exposed to expository, argumentative, descriptive, as well as narrative texts as well as methods of focusing on the skeletal framework of a piece of writing.  Students will be made to refresh their memory as far as subordination, coordination, etc. affecting sentences within a text are concerned.  They will again study the elements of critical thinking (problem solving, shaping an effective argument, as well as detecting fallacies).   Students will finally examine the paragraph as a unit of expression: elements of an effective paragraph (the topic sentence, support sentences, the concluding sentence), qualities of effective paragraphs (clarity, interest, unity, coherence). 

Reading List

1          Mattix Dietsch, B., Reading & Writing Well. Third edition, McGraw Hill,

            Toronto, 2003.

2          Crist, L. M, Man expressed: The realm of writing, Glencoe Press, California, 1971.

3          Gérard Vigner, Ecrire pour convaincre. Hachette, Paris, 1996.

4          Larousse, Larousse. Savoir rédiger, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2001.

 

FRE 109: Methods and Methodology in French (3 Credits)

This course broadens student teachers’ outlook in connection especially with the difference between methods and methodology within the context of French language teaching and learning.  Thus, students will be made to realize that “méthodes” refers to the various teaching-learning manuals (Arc-en-ciel, Pierre et Seydou, etc.) whilst “méthodologies” refers to the various French teaching-learning approaches: traditional method, direct method, oral-oral method, audio-visual method, communicative approach, etc.  Students will undertake a thorough study of the key “methods” and approaches to enable them assess and determine what textbooks and approach to adopt in any given language teaching-learning situation.

Reading List

1          CUQ, Jean-Pierre, GRUCA Isabelle, Cours de didactique de français langue étrangère et seconde. Presses universitaires de Grenoble, Grenoble, 2005.

2          RECFLEA, Langue française. Diversité culturelle, intégration régionale. Editions HAHO, Lomé, 2008.

3          PUREN, Christian et al, Se former en didactique des langues. Ellipses, Paris, 1998.

4          Castellotti, V., De Carlo, M., La formation des enseignants de langue. CLE International, Paris, 1995.

5          Mourlhon-Dallies, F., Enseigner une langue a des fins professionnelles. Didier, Paris, 2008.

6          Bérard, Evelyne, L’approche communicative. Théories et pratiques. CLE International, Paris, 1991.

7          Yaiche, Francis, Les simulations globales. Mode d’emploi. Hachette, Paris, 1986.

8          Chomsky, Noam, Réflexions sur le langage, Librairie François Mispero, Paris, 1977.

Castellotti, V., De Carlo, M., La formation des enseignants de langue. CLE International, Paris, 1995.

9          Mourlhon-Dallies, F., Enseigner une langue à  des fins professionnelles. Didier, Paris, 2008.

 

EDU 111: Foundations of Education (3 Credits)

This course is in two parts.  The first part deals with the social functions of education while the second part deals with Western and African philosophical ideals that underpin the aims, content, methods and organization of education in Ghana.

Reading List

1          FARRANT, J. S., Principles and Practice of Education, 1980.

2          NACINO Brown R., et al, Curriculum and Instruction, 1982.

3          DONDIEU, C. K., Education Studies for Teacher Training colleges, 1998.

4          Appiah Amankwah, Peter, Interview manual for personnel in the GES due for promotion, Mobby Kreation, Kumasi, 2012.

5          Archer, F., Yeboah Asiamah, K., Contemporary Issues in Ghanaian Education, (Vol. 1), PAKS Publications, Kumasi, 2007.

6          Dzobo, N.K, Amegashie-Viglo, S., The triple heritage of contemporary Africa, Studio 7 KAT, Accra, 2004.

 

 

 

ENG 111:       English for JSS and SSS                                                                  (3 credits)

 

This course has been designed to develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  It aims to take students through the syllabi of JSS and SSS to give them an in - depth knowledge of content to enable them to handle content effectively. There is the need for students offering French to read some English language courses such as this in order to meet some demands in the French as a foreign language classroom. Consequently, they are supposed to attain high proficiency in English to help them in their study of other subjects as well as cultivate the habit of and interest in reading in such a way as to communicate effectively.

 

Reading List

1          Tamakloe, E.K. et al., Principles and Methods of Teaching. Ghana Universities Press, Accra, 2005.

2          Cook, V., Second Language Learning and Second Language Teaching, Oxford University Press, New York, 1996.

3          Crystal, D., Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language. 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2000.

4          Hismanoglu, M., Language learning strategies in foreign language teaching. The internet TESL Journal, Vol. vi, no 8, August. 2000.

5          Sackeyfio, N.A., Objetive English for Top Senior Secondary Schhols, Accra Catholic Press, Accra, 1998.

6          Maciver, Angus, The new first aid in English, Robert Gibson, Glasgow, 1986.

 

ENG 113: Communicative Skills I (3 Credits)

This course aims at focusing on providing practical communication skills in the “rhetorical tradition” and in a theoretical understanding of the principles of human communications.  In the “rhetorical tradition”, the course will guide students to improve their writing skills, with much practice in report writing.  It is expected that at the end of the course, students would have acquired some skills for linguistic communication.

 

Reading List

 

1          Merrier, Patricia, The Basics: Business Communication, 3rd ed. Thomson, 2005.

2          Hatch, L.G, Arguing in Communities: Reading and Writing Arguments in Context, 3rd edition, McGraw-Hill, Boston 2003.

3          Sackeyfio, N.A., Objetive English for Top Senior Secondary Schhols, Accra Catholic Press, Accra, 1998.

4          Maciver, Angus, The new first aid in English, Robert Gibson, Glasgow, 1986.

5          Crystal, D., Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language. 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2000.

 

EDU 113: HIV and Aids Studies (0 Credit)

This course focuses on HIV and AIDS: origin, historical associations, viral characteristics, transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis and epidemiology.  It also takes a look at the impact of culture, traditional beliefs and value systems in the control of sexuality and the spread of the disease in humans.  Socioeconomic factors:  poverty, tourism and cross-cultural interactions.  Rehabilitation and income-generating opportunities for HIV/AIDS affected and infected individuals.  Substance abuse: factors predisposing the youth and abusable substance, impact on youth, adults and sexuality.  The course also looks at the psychological disposition and counseling for people living with HIV and AIDS, as well as care and management of HIV and AIDS patients.

Reading List

 

1          Bailey, A. C. & Fisher, M. : “Current use of antiretroviral treatment”, British medical bulletin, vol. 87, pp. 175-192, 2008.

2          Hailey, J.: HIV and AIDS, Spimmey Press, Thirroul, N.S.W., 2011.

Rambaut, A. et al, ‘The causes and consequences of HIV evolution’, Nature, vol. 5, pp. 52-81, 2004.

3          Sharp, PM & Hahn, BH, ‘The evolution of HIV-1 and the origins of AIDS’, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Biological Sciences, vol. 365, pp. 605-606, 2008.

EDU 115: Introduction to Information Technology (3 Credits)

The over-all aim of this course is to introduce students to the basic architecture of a computer.  It also focuses on how a computer works (basic operation system knowledge.  It is expected that at the end of the course, students would have acquired some fundamental basis in the use of the computer, with emphasis on applications such as word processing (MS Word), spreadsheet (MS Excel), Data Base (MS Access), Power Point and World Wide Web (internet browsing and e-mail).  Students would also be introduced to ways of retrieving information from various media.  At the end of the course, students should be able to use the computer with a certain level of competency.

Reading List

 

1          Vikas, Gupta: Secret guide to computers, 2010.

2          International Computer Driving License Syllabus Version 5.0. The ICDL Foundation (2010).

3          Addo, C.K., Computing made easy, UGC Publishing House, Kumasi, 2006.

4          Mangenot, F. et Louveau, E., Techniques et pratiques de classe: Internet et la classe de langue. CLE International, Paris, 2006.

 

BGE 111 Personal Development (Special Course: Non-scoring)              (3 Credit)

This is a course designed to increase the success of the learner in school, at work, in the community and in the global society. Students will be able to explain personal development from Western and Eastern traditions, religious, economic and political point of view.  Students will discover their capabilities and be able to create. The course affords the students the opportunity to research and discover the principles, philosophies, and success stories of successful people, summarize a popular personal development book titled Think and Grow Rich and do personal branding. Students will do pragmatic studies about Leadership/ Followership/Situation with case studies.   Developing personal principles and philosophies and living by them is part of the course. Students will learn how successful entrepreneurs mobilize funds and manage their finances. The course also affords students the opportunity to know the types of education, how to combine education with work and to take advantage to ensure holistic development.

Reading List

 

1          CARRINGTON, A. in LUND, J., ALPERT, B. Healthy Exchanges Lifetime Plan, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, 1996.

2          COTTRELL, S., Skills for success, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2003.

3          GREEN, J. D. et al., Psychology, Pearson, Toronto, 2004.

4          HAWKINS, D., Transcending the levels of consciousness: the stairway to enlightenment, Veritas Publishing, W. Sedona, 2006.

5          Microsoft® Encarta® 2008. © 1993-2007 Microsoft Corporation.

6          ROSS, R., Psychology, the science of mind and behaviour, Hodder & Stoughton, London, 1994.

 

YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2

FRE 102: Basic French Language 2 (Usage and Structure) (3 credits)

This course will treat various aspects of grammar such as basic sentence types: by way of form (declarative, imperative, etc.), as well as by way of function (simple, complex, etc.) for more effective means of expression.  The major objective is to inculcate in the student-teacher basic linguistic competence to enable them express themselves well, forming acceptable simple sentences to express real situations.  This general introduction to sentence syntax will again help students to use the linguistic competence in real communication situations and train them as well for the higher language function such as discourse analysis, linguistics and advanced French literary studies.  This is in view of the basic fact that the students are being trained to impart knowledge later and this makes it imperative for them to conceptualize the language system that they are learning to go and teach.

 

Reading List

 

1          Hurtubise, HMH. Bescherelle, La grammaire pour tous : dictionnaire de la grammaire en 27 chapitre,  [nouv. ed.], Montréal, 2006:

2          Grand dictionnaire des difficultés et pièges du français, Paris : Larousse. 2004.

3          Grevisse, Maurice. (2009). Le français correct: guide pratique des difficultés, 6e ed. rév. par Michele Lenoble-Pinson, Bruxelles : De Boeck-Duculot.

4          Riegel, M. et al (1994): Grammaire méthodique du Français, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris.

5          Bérard, Evelyne. Grammaire du français. Comprendre, réfléchir, communiquer. Didier Paris, 2005.

6          Bescherelle. La conjugaison pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 2006.

7          Germain, Claude et al,  Le point sur la grammaire, CLE International, Paris, 1998.

 

FRE 104: Oral Expression 2 (3 Credits)

This is a continuation of the application of the theories learnt in Oral Expression 1 to enable students practise their spoken skills.  Thus, major areas to be covered include introduction of members of the family, comparing nuclear and extended families, expressing sentiments, narrating stories using the present and past tense, explaining the importance of activities such as tourism in Ghana, traditional festivals, etc., describing some diseases and providing their preventions and cure. 

Reading List

1          Girodet, Jean,  Pièges des difficultés de la langue française, Bordas, Paris, 2007.

2          WEISS, François, Communiquer en français. Jouer, communiquer, apprendre. Hachette, Paris, 2002.

3          Lamailloux, P. et al (1993) : Fabriquer Des Exercices De Français : Paris : Hachette

4          Martins, C., Mabilat, J.-J., Sons et intonation. Exercices de prononciation. Didier, Paris, 2004.

5          Lebrun, C., Poumarede, G., Français. 800 mots pour réussir. Belin, Paris, 1994.

6          Moirand, Sophie, Enseigner à communiquer en langue étrangère. Hachette, Paris, 1990.

7          Cicurel, F., et al, Communiquer en français. Actes de parole et pratiques de conversation. Didier, Paris, 1991.

 

FRE 106: Reading Comprehension and Summary Writing 2 (3 Credits)

This course involves application of the theoretical aspects of techniques of written expression and production learnt in Semester I.   Students will be made to do comprehension and summary exercises involving texts selected from a variety of sources.  This will indeed offer them the tools for massive textual analysis such as the novel.

Reading List

 

1          Mattix Dietsch, B.: Reading & Writing Well Third edition, McGraw Hill,

Toronto. 2003

 

2          Pougeoise, Michel, Dictionnaire de grammaire et des difficultés grammaticales, Armand

Colin Paris, 1998.

3          Charaudeau, Patrick, Grammaire du sens et de l’expression, Hachette, Paris, 1992.

4          Grevisse, Maurice, et André Goosse, Le bon usage: grammaire française, 15e éd., De

Boeck-Duculot, Bruxelles 2011.

 

FRE 108: Essay Writing 2 (3 Credits)

This course involves application of the theoretical aspects of essay writing learnt in Semester I.  Students will be made to write essays of all types (narrative, descriptive, expository, and argumentative).  These include letter writing.  Apart from helping students practice techniques of written expression, the course indeed offers them the rudiments for writing their project work.

Reading List

1          Mattix Dietsch, B: Reading & Writing Well. Third edition, McGraw Hill,

            Toronto, 2003.

2          Crist, L. M, Man expressed: The realm of writing, Glencoe Press, California, 1971.

3          Gérard Vigner, Ecrire pour convaincre. Hachette, Paris, 1996.

4          Larousse, Larousse. Savoir rédiger, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2001.

 

FRE 110: Introduction to Literature-in-French (Theory) (3 credits)

This course will equip students with the basic theories of Literature-in-French especially in connection with the various forms of literature (scientific and imaginative; the essay, poetry, drama, prose, etc.) as well as diverse types with special emphasis on French and African Literature.  Students will again learn and identify the various literary devices both in isolation and within selected texts from a variety of sources.  The basic knowledge acquired here will be used in handling Francophone and French Literature later in the programme.

Reading List

 

1          Joubert, Jean-Louis et al, Littérature. Anthologie francophone, Nathan, Paris, 1992.

2          Falq, J., Kane, M., Littérature Africaine. Textes et travaux. Nathan, Paris, 1978.

3          Reuter, Yves, Introduction à  l’analyse du roman, Bordas, Paris, 1992.

4          Tzvetan Todorov, Les formes du discours, cité dans Michel Corvin, Qu’est-ce que la comédie, Paris, Dunod, 1914.

5          Dupriez, B.: Les procédés littéraires, U.G.E., 1984.

6          Jenny, L.: Les figures de rhétorique, Editions Barras, 2000.

7          Jenny, L.: Les genres littéraires, Editions Barras, 2003.

 

ENG 112: Introduction to English Grammar (3 Credits)

This course focuses on theory and practice in the analysis and description of modern English, emphasizing syntax.  The course takes students through the sentence a unit of discourse, the types or structural and functional differences in speech and writing.

Reading List

 

1          Halliday, M.A.K. (1967–68). Notes on transitivity and theme in English, Parts 1–3, Journal of Linguistics 3(1), 37–81; 3(2), 199–244; 4(2), 179–215

2          Halliday, M.A.K. Explorations in the functions of language. Edward Arnold,

London, 1973.

3          Halliday M.A.K. Learning how to mean, Edward Arnold, London, 1977.

4          Maciver, Angus, The new first aid in English, Robert Gibson, Glasgow, 1986.

 

EDU 112: Educational Psychology (3 Credits)

This is a comprehensive course designed to introduce prospective teachers to the psychological influences responsible for the behavior and learning characteristics of individual students.  It includes knowledge of the forces of nature and nurture as they affect the physical, psycho-social, cognitive and moral characteristics of the learner in school.  It also includes knowledge on how the teacher can identify special needs in the individual as well s the principles and strategies to employ in helping and counseling learners to develop their potentials in full.

Reading List

1          SANTROCK, J. W., Educational Psychology.  Burr Ridge, Boston, 2008.

2          BRANSFORD, J. D., & Donovan, M. S., Scientific inquiry and How People learn.  In M. 3          S. Donovan & J. D. Bransford (Eds.), How students learn. National Academes Press,

            Washington, DC, 2005.

4          Case, R., Conceptual structures. In M. Bennett (Ed.), Developmental psychology.  Psychology Press, Philadelphia, 2000.

 

ENG 114: Communicative Skills II (3 Credits)

The second semester for this course will exercise students in the expression of ideas dealing with an audience, engaging in dialogue, and developing skills in interpersonal communication, with exercise and practice in public speaking and group communication.  It is expected that at the end of the course, students would have acquired some skills for linguistic communication.

Reading List

 

1          Merrier, Patricia, The Basics: Business Communication, 3rd ed. Thomson, 2005.

2          Hatch, L.G, Arguing in Communities: Reading and Writing Arguments in Context, 3rd edition, McGraw-Hill, Boston 2003.

3          Sackeyfio, N.A., Objetive English for Top Senior Secondary Schhols, Accra Catholic Press, Accra, 1998.

4          Maciver, Angus, The new first aid in English, Robert Gibson, Glasgow, 1986.

5          Crystal, D., Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language. 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2000.

 

EDU 114: Educational Technology (3 Credits)

 

This course aims at introducing students to various forms and use of information and communication technology in preparing teaching and learning resources.  More emphasis will be placed on alternative systems and models of instructional design, basic principles of design, methods and techniques of pre-design analysis, instructional strategy selection and sequencing.  Students will also be introduced to technological tools for teaching and student learning for presentation and development; and for administration and management.

Reading List

1          Jonassen David H. (ed.), Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology, 2nd edition, Routledge, London, 2003.

2          Spector, J., et al, Handbook of Research For Educational Communications and 3   Technology, 3rd edition, Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group, London, 2007.

4          Mayer, Richard, E. (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning, Cambridge University Press, London, 2005.

5          Reigeluth (ed.), Instructional-Design Theories and Models: A New Paradigm

6          Instructional Theory, Vol. 2, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, London, 1999.

 

YEAR 2, SEMESTER 1

FRE 201: Intermediate French Language 1 (Structure and Usage)   (3 Credits)

This course is the continuation of French Language Usage 2.  It trains further in identification of more structural and functional sentence types using selected texts of various forms.  The introduction of basic sentence analysis will follow to produce the benefit of inculcating discourse analysis prowess and enhance thereby the beginning of syntax analysis and communication in their higher form.

Reading List

1          Grevisse, Maurice, Le petit Grevisse : grammaire française, 32c éd., De Boeck-Duculot      Bruxelles, 2009.

2          Hanse, Joseph, et Daniel Blampain. Nouveau dictionnaire des difficultés du

français moderne, 5e éd., De Boeck, Bruxelles, 2005.

3          Larousse, Dictionnaire des règles du français: orthographe, grammaire, conjugaison,

Larousse, Paris, 2008.

4          Riegel, M., et al, Grammaire méthodique du français, Presses universitaires de France,

Paris, 1998.

5          Bescherelle 2. L’orthographe pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 1990.

6          Bérard, Evelyne. Grammaire du français. Comprendre, réfléchir, communiquer. Didier Paris, 2005.

7          Bescherelle. La conjugaison pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 2006.

8          GERMAIN, Claude et al,  Le point sur la grammaire, CLE International, Paris, 1998.

 

FRE 203: Introduction to Francophone African Literature 1 (3 Credits)

Students will be introduced to the basic origins of African literature with emphasis on the socio-historical context that gave rise to such literature.  Literary works by francophone writers especially from sub-Saharan Africa shall include all literary forms (prose, drama, and poetry).   The course will again teach the skills for francophone literary appreciation and prepare students as well for Introduction to Francophone African Literature 2.

Reading List

1          Owusu-Sarpong Albert: Littérature négro-africaine francophone : genèse et développement [1960-1980], 1990.

2          Joubert Jean-Louis (Ed.), Littérature Francophone. Nathan, Paris, 1992.

3          Césaire, A.: Une Saison au Congo, Editions du Seuil, Paris, 1967.

4          Dadié, B. Monsieur Thôgô-gni gni,  Présence Africaine, Paris, 1967.

5          Kourouma, A. : Les soleils des indépendances, Edition du Seuil, Paris, 1968.

6          Oyono-M., G. (1978), Trois prétendants, un mai, Yaoundé, CLES.

7          Falq, J. et Kane, M.  (1978) : Littérature africaine, Nathan Afrique, Paris.

8          Oyono, F.  (1956) Une vie de boy : Littérature africaine, Nathan Afrique, Paris.

 

FRE 205: Principles and Techniques of Teaching French (3 Credits)

 

ENG 213: The Use of English (3 Credits)

The course aims at developing the speaking and writing skills of students.  It reinforces the skills of comprehension, summary and paraphrasing using texts from a variety of sources.

Reading List

1          Bloomer, A., et al, Introducing Language in Use: A Coursebook. Routledge. London,

2005.

2          Montgomery, M., An Introduction to Language and Society. (3rd edition): Routledge.,

London, 2008.

3          Coffin, C., et al,  Exploring English Grammar: from formal to functional.: Routledge,

London 2009

4          Sackeyfio, N.A., Objective English for Top Senior Secondary Schools, Accra Catholic

Press, Accra, 1998.

5          Maciver, Angus, The new first aid in English, Robert Gibson, Glasgow, 1986

 

EDU 213: Education of Students with Special Needs (3 Credits)

This course seeks to equip students with the requisite fundamental knowledge in handling students with special needs as far as teaching and learning are concerned.  Students will learn the principles and strategies needed to identify and manage the learning processes of the physically or mentally challenged student.  This course is relevant to these teachers in the sense that inclusive education is now part of the educational policies of Ghana.

Reading List

1.         Appiah, K. A.: Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers.  New York: W. W. Norton, 2006.

2.         Amheim, D. D. & Sinclair, W. A. : The Clumsy Child: A Program of Motor Therapy. St. Louis, MO: C. V. Mosby, 1975.

3.         Bandura, A. : Social Foundations of Thought and Action.  Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1986.

4.         Bandura, A.: Social Learning Theory. New York: General Learning Press, 1971.

5.         Berand, G.: Hearing, equals behavior. New Canaan, CT: Keats. 1993.

EDU 211: Educational Statistics and Measurement (3 Credits)

The course introduces students to the nature of statistics with a description of variables, scales of measurement and the differences between descriptive and inferential statistics.  Data representation is treated with emphasis on frequency distributions, histograms, polygons, gives, bar and pie charts, as well as box and whisker plots.  The nature and role of the measures of location, variability and relative position are explained.

Students are introduced to the concept of probability with emphasis on the addition and multiplication roles and the nature, properties and applications of the normal distribution.  Measures of relationship and correlation are explained and their roles in education are discussed. Basic ideas about statistical inference (sampling distributions) are treated, leading to an introduction to hypothesis testing.  Statistical tools such as regression analysis, chi-square test, t-test, Mann-Whitney test, Wilcoxon signed rank test.  One-way analysis of variance and the Kruskall-Wallis test are mentioned briefly with emphasis on when they can be used.

Reading List

1          Abele, A. , Probabilities: Learning by doing or learning by imitating. In D. R. Grey, P. Holmes, V. Barnett and G. M. Constable (ed) (1983) Proceedings of the First International Conference on Teaching Statistics, Sheffield, 9-13 August. Volume II, (pp. 813-828) Sheffield: University of Sheffield. {W}, London, 1982.

3          Abele, A., How to teach statistical concepts to slow-learning pupils. In R. Davidson and J. Swift (eds) The Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Teaching Statistics, (pp. 68-72). Victoria B.C: University of Victoria. {W}, London, 1986.

4          Ahlgren, A., Statistics in Project 2061 curriculum development. In D. Vere-Jones (ed) (1991) Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Teaching Statistics. Vol. 1. School and General Issues. (pp. 56-58). Voorburg: ISI. {W}, London, 1990.

 

EDU 215: Principles and Practice of Curriculum and Instruction (3 Credits)

The course is designed to provide students with the understanding of the nature and types of curriculum, as well as the process of its development.  It looks at the different models for conceptualizing the process of curriculum planning and development.  The course further examines various models for organizing instructional programmes, with their underlying epistemological, ontological and pedagogical philosophies.

Reading List

1          Glatthorn, A.A., et al, Curriculum leadership. Thousand Oakes, CA, 2006.

2          Hooper, R. (Ed.), The curriculum: context, description and development, Oliver and Boyd, Edinburg, 1973.

3          Kelly, A.V., The national curriculum: A critical review. Paul Chapman, London,

1994.

4          Kelly, A.V., The curriculum: Theory and practice (5th ed). London, 2004.

5          Besse, H., (1985), Méthodes et pratiques des manuels des langues. Paris : CLE International.

6          Bougnoux, D. : Introduction aux sciences de la communication. Paris : La Découverte. (2001).

7          Bracops, M. Introduction à la pragmatique. Bruxelles : De Boeck. (2005).

8          Germain, Claude, (1993). Evolution de l’enseignement des langues : 500 ans d’histoire. Paris: CLE International.

9          Adentwi, K.I., Curriculum Development: An Introduction, Omens Printing Press, Kumasi, 2005.

10        Archer, F., Adentwi, K.I., Education Management and School Administration., Biraa Press, Kumasi, 2006.

11        Oti-Agyen, P., The Development of Education In Ghana, Adu Press, Kumasi, 2007.

12        Dzobo, N.K, Amegashie-Viglo, S., The triple heritage of contemporary Africa, Studio 7 KAT, Accra, 2004.

13        Amoakohene, S.K., Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Seneps Publications, Kumasi, 2006.

14        Archer, F., Yeboah Asiamah, K., Contemporary Issues in Ghanaian Education, (Vol. 1), PAKS Publications, Kumasi, 2007.

 

BTM 211 Christology (Special Course – Non-scoring)

This course surveys the portraits of Jesus Christ and the presentation of this teaching and ministry in the four biblical Gospels.  Some attention is given to the “guest of the historical Jesus” and its contemporary manifestation and status in biblical study.  The course thus gives in-depth studies about the deity and humanity of Christ, his teachings and ministry to the marginalized in the society, death and resurrection.

Reading List

 

1          Asante, Emmanuel, Jesus the Christ: A Survey of the Christological Quest. Kumasi, Wilas Press Ltd, 2009.

2          Piper, John. Seeing and Savoring Jesus Christ. Wheaton: Crossway books, 2004.

3          Kaari, Ward (editor). Jesus and His Times. Pleasantville, the reader’s digest association

Inc., 1987.

4          Biblica Inc., Holy Bible. New International Version. Biblica, Colorado Springs, 1984.

 

BTM 213: Introduction to Worldviews

This involves a study of the different types of worldviews and philosophies and their evaluation from a biblical Christian standpoint.  The course is in three parts:    

  • Firstly, a comparative study of the worldviews of the major world religions (African Traditional Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism).
  • Secondly, an examination of the African cultural and Western scientific worldviews.
  • Thirdly, a basic analysis of the worldviews of subjects as diverse as theology, ethics, law, biology, psychology, sociology, economics, politics and history.

Reading List

1          Sire, J. W., The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview Catalog... InterVarsity, 1997.

2          Mark, J., Rethinking Worldview: Learning to Think, Live and Speak in This World.

            Bertrand. Crossway, 2007.

3          Bader-Saye, S., Following Jesus in a Culture of Fear. Brazos Press, London, 2007.

4          Sayers, M., The Trouble with Paris: Following Jesus in a World of Plastic Promises.

            Thomas Nelson, London, 2008.

5          David K., Worldview: The History of a Concept. Naugle Eerdmans, London, 2002.

 

YEAR 2, SEMESTER 2

FRE 202: Intermediate French Language 2 (Structure and usage)           (3 credits)

This course complements Intermediate French Language I.  It helps students to deepen their language competence especially as far as sentence syntax analysis using the paragraph is concerned.  This equips students with tools required for advanced studies in other aspects of the language.  Students will be introduced to The structure of the noun group (basic constituents, schematic representations, possible substitutions), functions within the noun group (the epithetic adjective, the noun complement, the apposition, the relative clause), the basic structure of the sentence, phrases and clauses, noun determiners, etc. The rationale behind this all is to equip students with tools for further sentence analysis as well as exposing them to more speech acts and vocabulary needed for French language usage at a higher level.  It constitutes a way of introducing advanced French language used mainly in different types of discourse.

Reading List

 

1          Pougeoise, Michel., Dictionnaire de grammaire et des difficultés gramma1icales,

Armand Colin, Paris, 1998.

2          Charaudeau, Patrick., Grammaire du sens et de l’expression, Hachette, Paris, 1992.

3          Grevisse, Maurice, et André Goosse., Le bon usage : grammaire française, 15e éd.,

De Boeck-Duculot, Bruxelles, 2011.

4          Gaonac’h, D. et al. (1990) : Acquisition Et Utilisation D’une Langue Etrangère : L’approche Cognitive : Paris : Hachette

5          Conseil de l’Europe (2005) : Cadre Européen Commun De Référence Pour Les Langues : Apprendre, Enseigner, Evaluer : Paris : Les Editions Didier.

6          Bescherelle. La conjugaison pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 2006.

7          GERMAIN, Claude et al,  Le point sur la grammaire, CLE International, Paris, 1998.

8          Bérard, Evelyne. Grammaire du français. Comprendre, réfléchir, communiquer. Didier Paris, 2005.

9          Bescherelle 2. L’orthographe pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 1990.

10        Larousse, Larousse Conjugaison, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

11        Dubois, Jean, Larousse Grammaire, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

12        Dubois, Jean, Larousse Orthographe, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

13        Lagane, René, Larousse. Difficultés grammaticales, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2006.

 

FRE 204: Curriculum Studies in French (3 Credits)

The course provides students with the opportunity t discuss the concept of curriculum as it relates to French.  It aims at helping students to understand the stages of curriculum planning and development as well as the various roles played by the French teacher.  It attempts to guide students to critically examine the syllabi of JHS and SHS, using the knowledge and understanding gained in order to add a practical perspective.

Reading List

1          Besse, H., Méthodes et pratiques des manuels des langues. Paris : CLE International. (1985).

2          Bougnoux, D. Introduction aux sciences de la communication. Paris : La Découverte. (2001).

3          Bracops, M. : Introduction à la pragmatique. Bruxelles : De Boeck. 2005.

4          Germain, Claude : Evolution de l’enseignement des langues : 500 ans d’histoire. Paris: CLE International. 1993.

5          Adentwi, K.I., Curriculum Development: An Introduction, Omens Printing Press, Kumasi, 2005.

6          Archer, F., Adentwi, K.I., Education Management and School Administration., Biraa Press, Kumasi, 2006.

7          Oti-Agyen, P., The Development of Education In Ghana, Adu Press, Kumasi, 2007.

8          Dzobo, N.K, Amegashie-Viglo, S., The triple heritage of contemporary Africa, Studio 7 KAT, Accra, 2004.

9          Amoakohene, S.K., Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Seneps Publications, Kumasi, 2006.

10        Archer, F., Yeboah Asiamah, K., Contemporary Issues in Ghanaian Education, (Vol. 1), PAKS Publications, Kumasi, 2007.

11        Appiah Amankwah, Peter, Interview manual for personnel in the GES dues for promotion, Mobby Kreation, Kumasi, 2012.

 

FRE 206: Nature and Teaching of French (3 Credits)

This course is designed to expose prospective student teachers to historical background of the French language – origin and evolution.  Students are taken through the functions of language in general and the French language in particular.  They are also introduced to the importance of French language to them as individuals and to Ghana as a nation.  The course also exposes students to varieties of French in the world.  In addition, students also learn about the contributions of some organizations in the teaching/learning of French in Ghana.

Reading List

 

  1. Calvet, J.-L., La guerre  des langues et les politiques linguistiques. Payot, Paris, 1985.
  2. Calvet, J.-L., Linguistique ct colonialisme. Payol, Paris, 2002.
  3. Geiger-Jaillet, A., Le bilinguisme pour grandir, Naître bilingue ou le devenir par I’ école. 

L’Harmattan, Paris, 2005.

  1. Tagliante, Cristine, La classe de langue. CLE International, Paris, 2001.
  2. Tagliante, Christine, L’évaluation. CLE International, Paris, 2001.
  3. Kuupole, D.D,  An insight into the teaching and learning of languages in contact in West
    • , St. Francis Press Ltd, Takoradi, 2003.
  4. Kuupole, D.D, Use and acquisition of language and culture. Effects on human society.

St. Francis Press Ltd, Takoradi, 2005.

  1. Gaonac’h, D. et al, Acquisition Et Utilisation D’une Langue Etrangère :
  2. Cognitive. Hachette, Paris, 1990.
    1. Jean-Pierre, C., Dictionnaire De Didactique Du Français Langue Etrangère Et Seconde.

CLE International, Paris, 2003.

  1.  Castellotti, V., De Carlo, M., La formation des enseignants de langue. CLE International, Paris, 1995.

 

FRE 208: Introduction to Francophone African Literature 2 (3 Credits)

This course allows students to build on the competence acquired in the previous semesters.  It is made up of language and application of language in literature. Students will study Francophone African literature with emphasis to post-independence literature.  Literary works by francophone writers especially from sub-Saharan Africa shall include all literary forms (prose, drama, and poetry).   The course will again teach the skills for francophone literary appreciation and prepare students as well for Advanced French Literary Studies.

Reading List

  1.      Owusu-Sarpong Albert: Littérature négro-africaine francophone : genèse et    

                  développement [1960-1980], 1990.

  1. Joubert Jean-Louis (Ed.), Littérature Francophone. Nathan, Paris, 1992.
  2. Césaire, A.: Une Saison au Congo, Editions du Seuil, Paris, 1967.
  3. Dadié, B. Monsieur Thôgô-gni gni,  Présence Africaine, Paris, 1967.
  4. Kourouma, A. : Les soleils des indépendances, Edition du Seuil, Paris, 1968.
  5. Opoku Agyeman, K, The image of Chaka in the neo-Negritude drama of   

Francophone West Africa, 1983.

  1. Opoku, A.: Black francophone drama as a mirror of the bitter aftermath of

independence, Africana Marburgensia, XVI, 1, Berlin, 1983.

  1. Oyono-M., G. (1978), Trois prétendants, un mari, Yaoundé, CLES.
  2. Ousmane, S. : Une prise de conscience in Voltaïque, Présence Africaine, 1992.  
  3. Falq, J. et Kane, M.  (1978) : Littérature africaine, Nathan Afrique, Paris.
  4.             Ousmane,  S. : Le Mandat (1965) Présence africaine

             

ENG 212: Introduction to Grammar (3 Credits)

This course employs an eclectic approach to the study of grammar.  It introduces students to advanced and complex grammatical structures and systematically relates these structures to meanings, uses and situations.

Reading List

 

1          Riegel, Martin, Jean-Christophe Pellat et Rene Rioul. (1998). Grammaire méthodique du français, Paris : Presses universitaires de France.

2          Boivin, Marie-Claude, et Reine Pinsonneault, Marie-Elaine Philippe. (2008). La grammaire moderne : description et éléments pour sa didactique. Montréal : Beauchemin, Cheneliere Education.

3          Bonenfant, Christine. André. Turcotte. Boite à outils: nouvelle grammaire. 3C éd., Mont-Royal Modulo, Québec, 2008.

 

YEAR 3, SEMESTER 1

301: Advanced French Language I (Structure and Usage) (3 Credits)

Advanced French Language 1 complements basic language and intermediate French language usage.  It reinforces the tools for syntax analysis already undertaken.  Students will thus be required to continue learning the tools for syntax analysis in such a way as to be capable of dissecting a sentence.  This will assist them especially in the application of the tools for the analysis of the paragraph as a unit of expression.

Reading List

1          Chartrand, Suzanne-G., Grammaire pédagogique du français d’aujourd’hui. 2e ed.,   

Cheneliere Education, Montreal, 2011.

2          Marie-Jose, Beguelin., De la phrase aux énoncés : grammaire scolaire et descriptions linguisliques. Editons De Boeck-Duculot, Bruxelles, 2000.

3          Genevay, Eric, Ouvrir la grammaire. Lausanne, Editions LEP, Loisirs et Pédagogie,

Suisse, 1994.

4          Bescherelle. La conjugaison pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 2006.

5          GERMAIN, Claude et al,  Le point sur la grammaire, CLE International, Paris, 1998.

6          CUQ, Jean-Pierre, GRUCA Isabelle, Cours de didactique de français langue étrangère et

seconde. Presses universitaires de Grenoble, Grenoble 2005.

7          Bescherelle 2. L’orthographe pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 1990.

8          Bérard, Evelyne. Grammaire du français. Comprendre, réfléchir, communiquer. Didier,   

Paris, 2005.

 

FRE 303: Measurement and Evaluation in French (3 credits)

 

This course is intended to equip student teachers with the requisite knowledge in assessing and holistically evaluating the output of their teaching and learning process with regard to how far their pupils have been affected by this process. They will be taken through various types of evaluation, the docimological principles, thus factors influencing evaluation of the learners, the profile dimensions with regards to weighting and allocation of marks according to the various language skills being developed as prescribed by the Junior and Senior High School syllabi, and test item construction and recording. The skills to be acquired here will help these student teachers to fairly assess their students.

Reading List

1          Tagliante, Christine, L’évaluation. CLE, International, Paris, 2001.

2          CRDD, Teaching Syllabus for French (Senior High School 1-3), CRDD, Accra, 2010.

3          Castellotti, V., De Carlo, M., La formation des enseignants de langue. CLE International, Paris, 1995.

4          Tagliante, Christine, l’évaluation et le cadre européen commun. CLE International, Paris, 2005.

5          Bérard, Evelyne, L’approche communicative. Théories et pratiques. CLE International,

Paris, 1991.

6          Tagliante, C. (2006) : Techniques Et Pratiques De Classe : La Classe De Langue : Paris :

7          Lamailloux, P. et al (1993) : Fabriquer Des Exercices De Français : Paris : Hachette

8          Jean-Pierre, C., Dictionnaire De Didactique Du Français Langue Etrangère Et Seconde.  

            CLE International,  Paris,  2003.

9          Gaonac’h, D. et al., Acquisition Et Utilisation D’une Langue Etrangère : L’approche

Cognitive. Hachette, Paris, 1990.

10        Conseil de l’Europe. Cadre Européen Commun De Référence Pour Les Langues : Apprendre, Enseigner, Evaluer. Les Editions Didier, Paris, 2005.

 

FRE 305: Introduction to French Literature (3 Credits)

This course allows students to build on the competence acquired in the previous semesters.  It is made up of language and application of language in literature.  Additionally, it comprises basic literary devices needed for French literature and civilization.  Contemporary techniques in foreign language demand that language should not be taught in abstraction.  The course therefore aims at equipping students with literary devices needed to appreciate literary work.  Since French literature depicts the culture of the French people, students will be exposed to the French culture.  This will help them understand better philosophical orientations of the French people.  Moreover, the course will prepare students for advanced work in grammar and literature.

 

Reading List

 

1          Bossuat, R.: Manuel bibliographique de la littérature française du Moyen âge, Slatkine, 1986.

2          Critical and biographical references for the study of French literature since 1885: New York : French institute, alliance Française, 1969.

3          De Beaumarchais, J.-P., et al: dictionnaire des littératures de langue françaises, Paris : Bordas, 1995.

4          Adam, J.-M.: Le style dans la langue, Lausanne-Paris : Delachaux et Nestlé, 1997.

5          Joubert, Jean-Louis et al, Littérature. Anthologie francophone, Nathan, Paris, 1992.

6          Reuter, Yves, Introduction à  l’analyse du roman, Bordas, Paris, 1992.

7          Tzvetan Todorov, Les formes du discours, cité dans Michel Corvin, Qu’est-ce que la comédie, Paris, Dunod, 1914.

8          Dupriez, B.: Les procédés littéraires, U.G.E., 1984.

9          Pichois, C. : Histoire de la littérature française, Paris : Flammarion GF ; 957-965), 1996-1998 9 vol.

10        Jenny, L.: Les figures de rhétorique, Editions Barras, 2000.

11        Jenny, L.: Les genres littéraires, Editions Barras, 2003.

12        Reuter, Yves, Introduction à l’analyse du roman, Bordas, Paris, 1992.

13        Hall, E., Le langage silencieux. Seuil, Paris, 1984b.

14        Camus, A., L’Etranger, Editions Gallimard, Paris, 1957.

15        Joubert Jean-Louis (Ed.). (1992). Littérature Francophone. Paris : Nathan.

 

EDU 311: Micro-Teaching (3 Credits)

This course is geared towards teaching skills acquisition and helping teacher trainees to practise and evaluate their use of the skills.  Highly critical for teacher-trainee improvement, it is meant to help students to imitate ideal teaching patterns.  It is again meant to simplify complexities of the regular teaching-learning process, and to acquaint students with the success of their performance in such a way as to be capable of evaluating and improving teaching behaviour.  The course will take the form of live demonstration or a video presentation of the relevant skills; whilst practice per se takes the form of short-period micro-teaching sessions in which teacher trainees take turns to teach their colleagues who in turn give feedback about presentations techniques. 

Reading List

1          Allen, D. & Ryan, K., Microteaching. Addison-Wesley, London, 1969.

2          Applebee, A. N., Microteaching component skills and the training of teachers: an evolution of a research and development project.  In British Journal of  Educational Technology 7, 2, 35-43. London,1976.

3          Jean-Pierre, C., Dictionnaire De Didactique Du Français Langue Etrangère Et Seconde.

            CLE International, Paris, 2003.

4          Lamailloux, P. et al, Fabriquer Des Exercices De Français. Hachette, Paris, 1993.

5          Lancien, T., Techniques De Classe : Le Document Vidéo. CLE International, Paris,  1986.

6          Lhote, Elisabeth, Enseigner L’oral En Interaction : Percevoir, Ecouter, Comprendre.

            Hachette, Paris, 1995.

7          Mangenot, F. et Louveau, E., Techniques et pratiques de classe: Internet et la classe de langue.      CLE International, Paris, 2006.

8          Tagliante, C., Techniques Et Pratiques De Classe : La Classe De Langue.

            CLE International, Paris, 2006.

9          Martins, C., Mabilat, J.-J., Sons et intonation. Exercices de prononciation. Didier,

            Paris, 2004.

 

ENG 311: Structure and Style of the English Language (3 Credits)

This course looks at relationships between the linguistic system and appropriate choices in specific communicative contexts.  Determinants of the communicative context, formality and informality, fluency and accuracy, politeness will be discussed.  Various concepts and how they are expressed – commands, requests, permission; the language of conversation, passivization and negation will be discussed.

Reading List

1          Halliday, M.A.K. (1967–68). Notes on transitivity and theme in English, Parts 1–3, Journal of Linguistics 3(1), 37–81; 3(2), 199–244; 4(2), 179–215

2          Halliday, M.A.K. (). Explorations in the functions of language. Edward Arnold,

London, 1973.

3          Halliday M.A.K. (1975). Learning how to mean, Edward Arnold, London, 1977.

4          Maciver, Angus, The new first aid in English, Robert Gibson, Glasgow, 1986.

5          Haspelmath, Martin, ... [et al.], The World Atlas of Language Structures., Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005.

6          Wales, K.,  A Dictionary of Stylistics. Longman, London, 1989.

 

 

 

EDU 313: Trends in Educational Development and Management in Ghana (3 Credits)

The course is in two parts.  The first part deals with the role of government and non-governmental bodies in the development and growth of formal education in Ghana.  The second part examines administration theories and their influence on the management and administration of school systems in Ghana.

Reading List

1          CCE - University of Cape Coast, Philosophical and Social Foundations of Education,

Cape Coast, 2001.

2          Ministry of Education, Educational Studies for Basic School Teachers, Winneba, 2001.

3          M. C. William, H. O. A. Kwabena – POH, MA (1975):  The Development of Education in Ghana, London, Longman Book Ltd.

4          Appiah Amankwah, Peter, Interview manual for personnel in the GES dues for promotion, Mobby Kreation, Kumasi, 2012.

5          Amoakohene, S.K., Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Seneps Publications,

            Kumasi, 2006.

6          Archer, F., Adentwi, K.I., Education Management and School Administration., Biraa Press, Kumasi, 2006.

7          Oti-Agyen, P., The Development of Education In Ghana, Adu Press, Kumasi, 2007.

Adentwi, K.I., Curriculum Development: An Introduction, Omens Printing Press, Kumasi, 2005.

 

EDU 313: Measurement & Evaluation of Teaching and Learning (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to educational assessment.  It deals with terms and concepts in assessment including continuous assessment and its practice in Ghana, goals and learning targets of instruction and their relevance in students’ assessment, characteristics of test results (validity and reliability), constructing achievement test (multiple-choice, true/false, matching, constructed response type and essay), test administration and test score interpretation.

Reading List

1          Acheson, K. & Gall, M., Techniques in the clinical supervision of teachers. Longman,

New York, 1980.

2          Aleamoni, L.M., Student ratings of instruction. In J. Millman (Ed.), Handbook of teacher

evaluation. Beverly Hills, CA, 1981.

3          Aleamoni, L.M., Student rating myths versus research facts. Journal of Personnel Evaluation in Education, 1, 1987.

4          Alfonso, R.J., Will peer supervision work? Educational Leadership.  1977.

5          Tagliante, Christine, l’évaluation et le cadre européen commun. CLE International, Paris, 2005.

6          Amoakohene, S.K., Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Seneps Publications,

Kumasi, 2006.

7          CRDD, Teaching Syllabus for French (Senior High School 1-3), CRDD, Accra, 2010.

 

EDU 312: Micro-Teaching (3 Credits)

In this course, students practise specific teaching skills in a non-threatening environment, getting feedback from peers and supervisors.  The specific teaching skills and practices include questioning techniques, use of the chalkboard, other audio-visual resources, systematic presentation, and lesson closure.  Also, opportunities are provided for students to observe good models of teaching through video presentations and demonstration of specific teaching techniques.

Reading List

1          Allen, D. & Ryan, K., Microteaching. Addison-Wesley, London, 1969.

2          Applebee, A. N., Microteaching component skills and the training of teachers: an evolution of a research and development project.  In British Journal of    Educational Technology 7, 2, 35-43. London,1976.

3          Jean-Pierre, C., Dictionnaire De Didactique Du Français Langue Etrangère Et Seconde.

            CLE International, Paris, 2003.

4          Lamailloux, P. et al, Fabriquer Des Exercices De Français. Hachette, Paris, 1993.

5          Lancien, T., Techniques De Classe : Le Document Vidéo. CLE International, Paris,  1986.

6          Lhote, Elisabeth, Enseigner L’oral En Interaction : Percevoir, Ecouter, Comprendre.

            Hachette, Paris, 1995.

7          Mangenot, F. et Louveau, E., Techniques et pratiques de classe: Internet et la classe de langue.      CLE International, Paris, 2006.

8          Tagliante, C., Techniques Et Pratiques De Classe : La Classe De Langue.

            CLE International, Paris, 2006.

9          Martins, C., Mabilat, J.-J., Sons et intonation. Exercices de prononciation. Didier,

            Paris, 2004.

 

YEAR 3, SEMESTER 2

FRE 302: Advanced French Language 2 (Structure and Usage) (3 Credits)

Advanced Language Usage 2 complements the grammatical analysis done in previous semesters.  This time, students – with their acquisition of analytical tools presumed - will be required to apply the various tools so far learnt to the analysis of sentences within paragraphs selected from various texts of varying degrees of difficulty.  This time, the emphasis will be more on identification of grammatical nomenclature and function of words or word groups than on mere sentence types according to structure and function.

Reading List

1          Chartrand, Suzanne-G., Grammaire pédagogique du français d’aujourd’hui. 2e ed.,   

Cheneliere Education, Montreal, 2011.

2          Marie-Jose, Beguelin., De la phrase aux énoncés : grammaire scolaire et

descriptions linguisliques. Editons De Boeck-Duculot, Bruxelles, 2000.

3          Genevay, Eric, Ouvrir la grammaire. Lausanne, Editions LEP, Loisirs et Pédagogie,

Suisse, 1994.

4          Bescherelle. La conjugaison pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 2006.

5          GERMAIN, Claude et al,  Le point sur la grammaire, CLE International, Paris, 1998.

6          CUQ, Jean-Pierre, GRUCA Isabelle, Cours de didactique de français langue étrangère et

seconde. Presses universitaires de Grenoble, Grenoble 2005.

7          Bescherelle 2. L’orthographe pour tous. Hatier, Paris, 1990.

8          Bérard, Evelyne. Grammaire du français. Comprendre, réfléchir, communiquer. Didier,   

Paris, 2005.

 

FRE 304: Introduction to Translation (3 Credits)

Basic, Intermediate and Advanced French language usage if well treated with appropriate teaching/learning resources and techniques should prepare students for fluency in both oral and written French.  This course is therefore designed to meet students’ professional needs in translation (Thème et Version).  The course is practical in nature and consists mainly of specific techniques in translation.

Reading List

1          Bassnett, Susan, Translation Studies.  Rev. ed. Routledge, London, 1991.

2          Lederer, Marianne, la traduction aujourd’hui. Hachette, Paris, 1994.

3          Atkins, B.T., Le Robert & Collins. (Senior). Dictionnaire Français/Anglais Anglais/Français. Happer Collins Publishers, Paris, 1993.

4          Larousse, Le Petit Larousse Illustré. Larousse, Paris, 2004.

 

ENG 312: English in Multilingual Contexts (3 Credits)

This course looks at the different forms and functions of English in communities that have languages unrelated to English as first language.  The growth of English as a world language, the emergence of new English, perceptions of non-native varieties of English, the relationship between English and indigenous language, and samples of Ghanaian English will be discussed.

Reading List

1          Kuupole, D.D,  An insight into the teaching and learning of languages in contact in West   Africa, St. Francis Press Ltd, Takoradi, 2003.

2          Kuupole, D.D, Use and acquisition of language and culture. Effects on human society.

St. Francis Press Ltd, Takoradi, 2005.

3          Gaonac’h, D. et al. (1990) : Acquisition Et Utilisation D’une Langue Etrangère : L’approche Cognitive : Paris : Hachette

4          Kuupole, D.D, (edited), Teaching and Learning of Language, Culture and Literature of West Africa, Catholic Mission Press, Cape Coast, 2008.

5          Amoakohene, S.K., Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Seneps Publications,

            Kumasi, 2006.

 

EDU 314: Education Research Methods (3 Credits)

This course introduces the student to scientific enquiry in education.  It presents to the student the nature of research, including characteristics of scientific research; the research problem, sources and characteristics of scientific research; the research problem sources and characteristics; literature review, its relevance and steps involved; basic research designs including descriptive survey, correlation, experimental and ex-post facto research and processing and interpreting data.  Research proposal and report writing are also discussed.  Students will eventually be able to, based on the above, effectively write their project work.

Reading List

 

1          Dickson, L., et al, Children learning mathematics: A teacher’s guide to recent research.

Cassell Educational Ltd,  London, 1990.

2          Gay, R.L., Educational research: Competencies for analysis and application.

Merrill/Macmillan, New York, 1992.

3          Best J. W. & Kahn, J.V., Research in education. Allyn and Bacon, Boston, 1991.

4          Larousse, Larousse. Savoir rédiger, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2001.

5          Castellotti, V., De Carlo, M., La formation des enseignants de langue. CLE International,

Paris, 1995.

 

EDU 316: Introduction to Guidance and Counselling (3 Credits)

Guidance and Counselling assists in the complete development of the individual in a way that ensures or maximizes personal growth and success in life.  This course recognizes that secondary of their educational experience.  It attempts to equip the student with information that will enable him/her to facilitate this process in a secondary school setting.  At the end of the course, students should be able to show a clear understanding of the guidance concept in the context of school personnel work, examine the principles under girding guidance practice, explore the services of a given guidance programme, show how to operationalize each guidance service, examine school-related problems and show how they can be addressed and examine the role of guidance personnel.

Reading List

1          Makinde, O., Fundamentals of Guidance and Counselling.  MacMillan Ltd., London,1991.

2          Teacher Education Division (GES), Education Studies Tutors’ Handbook  Education Panel. Accra, 1995.

3          Anyagre P. and Dondieu, C., Education Studies Volume 2.  University Press, Cape Coast, 2006.

4          Teacher Education Division (GES), Education Studies Book for Basic School Teachers.  I.E.D.E., Winneba, 2001.

5          Assoah, S.K., Guidance and Counselling in Education, Saviour Printing Press, Kumasi, 2007.

6          Adentwi, K.I., Curriculum Development: An Introduction, Omens Printing Press, Kumasi, 2005.

7          Archer, F., Adentwi, K.I., Education Management and School Administration., Biraa Press, Kumasi, 2006.

 

EDU 318: Comparative Education Systems (3 Credits)

This course surveys the education systems of selected Western, Eastern and African countries with a view to discovering among other features, the relationship among education and societal goals and the socio-economic character of a nation, by a comparison of education policies.  The focus of this course is on methodological rather than philosophical issues, but consideration will be given to the underlying issues that encourage differences in methodology.  At the end of the course, students should be able to understand the reason for the different systems of Education.

 

 

Reading List

1          Altbach, Philip G., Comparative Higher Education: Knowledge, the University, and Development. Ablex Pub. Corp., Greenwich, 1998.

2          Mark Bray, et al, (Ed.) Comparative Education Research Approaches and Methods.

Dordrecht Springer, Hong Kong, 2007.

3          Robert F. (Ed.), et al, Emergent Issues in Education: Comparative Perspectives.

State University of New York Press, New York, 1992.

4          Arnove, R., Torres, C. eds., Comparative Education: The Dialectic of the Global and the Local. Rowan and Littlefield, Oxford, 1999.

5          Appiah Amankwah, Peter, Interview manual for personnel in the GES dues for promotion, Mobby Kreation, Kumasi, 2012.

6          Archer, F., Yeboah Asiamah, K., Contemporary Issues in Ghanaian Education, (Vol. 1),

PAKS Publications, Kumasi, 2007.

7          Kuupole, D.D, (edited), Teaching and Learning of Language, Culture and Literature of West Africa, Catholic Mission Press, Cape Coast, 2008.

8          Oti-Agyen, P., The Development of Education In Ghana, Adu Press, Kumasi, 2007.

9          Adentwi, K.I., Curriculum Development: An Introduction, Omens Printing Press, Kumasi, 2005.

10        Archer, F., Adentwi, K.I., Education Management and School Administration., Biraa Press, Kumasi, 2006.

 

YEAR 4, SEMESTER 1

FRE 401: Teaching Practice (off-campus) (3 Credits)

This is a capstone experience in which the student spends a minimum of 4 weeks in a school setting appropriate to his/her professional career goals.  The student in turn teaches assigned classes and subjects under the guidance of school-based mentors.  Supervisors from the University of Cape Coast visit the schools regularly to monitor the students’ progress and offer counselling and professional support.

 

Reading List

1          Acheson, K. & Gall, M., Techniques in the clinical supervision of teachers. Longman,

New York, 1980.

2          American Educational Research Association , Second Report of the Committee on the Criteria of Teacher Effectiveness. Journal of Educational Research, 46, 641-658. 1953.

3          Annunziata, J. Fossey, R., If a practitioner cleans the windows, will you look in? Journal of Personnel Evaluation in Education. 13, 83-92. 1999.

4          Anthony, B.M.,  A new approach to merit rating of teachers. Administrator's Notebook,

17 (1), 1-4. 1968.
 

FRE 403: Project Work (3 Credits)

This course aims at providing students with some form of clinical supervision in the writing of their project work or dissertation.  The supervisor is expected to assist the student to identify a researchable topic; direct the student to the existing literature; assist in refining the methodology; supervise the research process; and act as a critic at all times and particularly at the wiring stage.  At the end of the course, students’ work is evaluated by their supervisors according to a laid-down assessment format.

Reading List

1          Jonassen David H. (ed.), Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology, 2nd edition, Routledge, London, 2003.

2          Spector, J., et al, Handbook of Research For Educational Communications and Technology, 3rd edition, Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group, London, 2007.

3          Dickson, L., et al, Children learning mathematics: A teacher’s guide to recent research.

            Cassell Educational Ltd,  London, 1990.

4          Gay, R.L., Educational research: Competencies for analysis and application. Merrill/Macmillan, New York, 1992.

5          Best J. W. & Kahn, J.V., Research in education. Allyn and Bacon, Boston, 1991.

6          Larousse, Larousse. Savoir rédiger, Clerc S.A.S., Paris, 2001.

7          Castellotti, V., De Carlo, M., La formation des enseignants de langue. CLE International, Paris, 1995.

 

 

YEAR 2, SEMESTER 2

FRE 402: French Culture (3 Credits)

French Culture exposes students to social and political life of the French people.  The course studies the political structure of the French government, political party organization, electoral process, etc.  In addition, students will be exposed to the French educational system.

Reading List

1          Rosenblum, Mort, Mission to Civilize: The French Way. Harcourt Brace, San Diego, 1986.

2          RECFLEA, Langue française. Diversité culturelle, intégration régionale. Editions HAHO, Lomé,  2008.

3          Beacco, J. C., L’approche par compétences dans l’enseignement des langues. Didier, Paris, 2007.

4          Conseil de l’Europe (2005) : Cadre Européen Commun De Référence Pour Les Langues :

            Apprendre, Enseigner, Evaluer : Paris : Les Editions Didier.

5          Kuupole, D.D, Use and acquisition of language and culture. Effects on human society. St. Francis Press Ltd, Takoradi, 2005.

6          Kuupole, D.D,  An insight into the teaching and learning of languages in contact in West Africa, St. Francis Press Ltd, Takoradi, 2003.

7          Njiké, J.N., Civilisation progressive de la Francophonie. CLE International, Paris. 2005

Mauchamp, Nelly, La France d’aujourd’hui. Civilisation. CLE International, Paris. 1991

8          Mauchamp, Nelly, La France de toujours. Civilisation. CLE International, Paris. 1987.

Mothier, Jean , Histoire de la France. Hachette, Paris, 1996.

 

FRE 404: Advanced Translation (3 Credits)

This course complements Introduction to Translation and equips students with more advanced techniques in translation.  It offers opportunity to students to sharpen their translation skills in order to translate technical and specialized documents from French into English and vice versa.

Reading List

1          Bassnett, Susan, Translation Studies.  Rev. ed. Routledge, London, 1991.

2          George, Steiner, After Babel, Aspects of Language and Translation. Amazon UK.

3          Roger T.B., Chrstopher, C., Translation and Translating: Theory and Practice.

4          Lederer, Marianne, la traduction aujourd’hui. Hachette, Paris, 1994.

5          Atkins, B.T., Le Robert & Collins. (Senior). Dictionnaire Français/Anglais, Anglais/Français. Happer Collins Publishers, Paris, 1993.

6          Larousse, Le Petit Larousse Illustré. Larousse, Paris, 2004.

 

ENG 412: Introduction to Linguistics (3 Credits)

This course introduces students formally to the system of the English language through the study of its various characteristics: definition, types (general, theoretical, applied, computational, etc.), divisions (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics), etc.  This will help students to know (to the point of being capable of describing) the system of the English language in such a way that they can effectively compare it with the system of the French language they intend assisting JHS and SHS students to acquire.

ENG 412: Introduction to Linguistics (3 Credits)

This course introduces students formally to the system of the English language through the study of its various characteristics: definition, types (general, theoretical, applied, computational, etc.), divisions (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics), etc.  This will help students to know (to the point of being capable of describing) the system of the English language in such a way that they can effectively compare it with the system of the French language they intend assisting JHS and SHS students to acquire.

Reading List

1          Halliday, M.A.K. (2003). On Language and Linguistics, Jonathan Webster (ed.), Continuum International Publishing.

2          Halliday, M.A.K. (2002). Linguistic studies of text and discourse, Jonathan Webster (ed.), Continuum International Publishing

3          Handbook of the International Phonetic Association: a Guide to the Use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. International Phonetic Association.
Cambridge, UK; NY: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

4          Studies in Relational Grammar/ ed. David M. Perlmutter/ Chicago: University of Chicago
            Press/ 1982.

 
5          John R.Taylor/Linguistic Categorization: Prototypes in Linguistic Theory/ Oxford,  
            Clarendon Press/1989.

 

FRE 406: Advanced French Literary Studies (3 Credits)

This course complements introduction to literature.  It is made up of language and application of language in literature.  It discusses other forms of literature (drama and poetry).  Also, the course will contribute to French Language Usage.  It offers an additional opportunity to students to discover modern trends in literary studies.  The course covers contemporary French and Francophone-African literature (both pre- and post-independence eras).

Reading List

1          Bureau, R., Apprentissage et culture. Karthala, Paris ,1988.

2          Camilleri, C., Anthropologie culturelle et éducation. UNESCO, Paris 1985.

3          Cambra, M, Une approche ethnographique de la classe de langue. Didier, Paris, 2003.

4          Zarate, Genevive. Enseigner une culture étrangère. Hachette, Paris, 1986.

5          Kourouma, A. :  Allah n'est pas obligé, Seuil, 2002.

6          Lang, P.,  African independence from francophone and anglophone voices : a

comparative study of the post-independence novels by Ngugi and Sembène Ousmane, 1994.

7          Ndébéka, M. Le Président. Honfleur, Paris, 1970.

8          Joubert, Jean-Louis et al, Littérature. Anthologie francophone, Nathan, Paris, 1992.

9          Falq, J., Kane, M., Littérature Africaine. Textes et travaux. Nathan, Paris, 1978.

10        Reuter, Yves, Introduction à l’analyse du roman, Bordas, Paris, 1992.

 

 

 

FRE 404: Introduction to Linguistics in French (3 Credits)

This is an introductory course in French linguistics.  It initiates students into the general areas of French linguistics such as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.  Students are exposed to technical terms associated with general linguistic theories.  In addition, they will be initiated into practical aspects of language as a complex system of signs.

Reading List

1          Adam, J-M., Eléments de Linguistique textuelle. Margada, Liège, 1990.

2          Arcaini, E., Principes de la linguistique appliquée. Payot, Paris, 1972.

3          Austin, J.L., Quand dire c’est faire. Seuil, Paris, 1970.

4          Bakhtine, M., Le marxisme et la philosophie du langage : essai d’application de la méthode sociologique en linguistique. Minuit, Paris, 1977.

5          Baylon, C., Initiation à la linguistique : Cours et applications corrigées.

            Minuit, Paris, 1990.

6          Benveniste, E., Problèmes de la linguistique générale. Gallimard, Paris, 1966.

7          Berrendonner, A., Eléments de pragmatique linguistique. Minuit, Paris, 1981.

8          Calvet, L-J.,  La sociolinguistique. Presses Universitaires de France, Paris, 1993.

9          Ducrot, O., 1. Dire et ne pas dire: Principes de sémantique linguistique,

            Hermann , Paris, 1972.

10        Gumperz, J.J., Sociolinguistique interactionnelle: Une approche interprétative,

            L’Harmattan-Université de La Réunion, Paris, 1989.

11        Fehr, J., Saussure entre linguistique et sémiologie.  PUF, Paris, 2000.

12        Lacorne, D., JUDT, T., La politique de Babel: Du monolinguisme d’Etat au

           plurilinguisme des peuples. Karthala, Paris, 2002.

13        Lerot, J., Précis de la linguistique générale. Minuit, Paris, 1993.


 

Name of Staff

Sex

Highest

Qualification

Institution

Rank

Full Time/

Part Time

Area of

Speciali-

zation

  1. Ebenezer Adu-Gyamfi

M

MA (French Didactics)

 

BA Arts (French  and English)

DALF C1

Dijon – France (2015)

 

KNUST   (2008)

AF (Kumasi)  2009

Lecturer

FT

Teaching of French,

 

Grammar

 

Functional French

 

  1. Robert Davor

M

Mphil

BA Arts

3-Yr Post-Sec Cert “A”

KNUST (2012)

UCC (2001)

Mt Mary Training College (1996)

Lecturer

PT

Linguistics

  1. Yevu-Agbi 

        Komi

M

Mphil

BA Arts (French)

PGT in Theology

UG (2007)

UG (1994)

 

Christian Service University College

Lecturer

PT

Linguistics

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